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Archive for July, 2014

Sometimes it is best to stay in the boat

We just finished our annual summer vacation with the family. We enjoy taking everyone to the Black Hills in South Dakota. We rent a cabin for the week and the set out to explore and enjoy the area. This year we decided to spend a day on Lake Pactola (about 30 minutes from Mount Rushmore). We reneted a pontoon boat for the day and planned a relaxing day.

The problem came as we were checking out the boat and I noticed tee shirts for sale that said “I survived Cliff jumping at Jenny Gulch”. By nature I am an adrenaline junkie, so I was very interested. After spending some time exploring the lake, we found Jenny Gulch. It was not marked, but with the help of You Tube videos we were able to safely identify the 30-40 foot cliff (depending on water levels).

Two of the twenty some year olds were the first explore the top of the cliff. Meanwhile my wife, myself and my future daughter in law stayed in the boat. After about 30 minutes of them trying to decide whether they should jump, my future daughter in law jumped out of the boat, went to the top and jumped. My wife and I stayed in the boat and took videos and photos. The other 2 jumped and everyone was excited and petrified at the same time.

The adrenaline junkie (me) stayed the in the boat.  My wife would never do something like this, so I was the only one who would even consider doing something that people half my age had just done. I jumped out of the boat, walked to the top and jumped off the cliff. I landed with a large splash since I entered the water in a more horizontal position rather than a vertical one.

As the day progressed, we realized the role that adrenaline plays in the body to mask pain. In the days that followed, bruises started to show on everyone and mine covered over 2 square feet of my body. As I look back, I think I should have stayed in the boat. My wife who stayed in the boat had a wonderful, exciting, pain free experience that day.

I started to think about how in ministry, we often do the same thing. A new program looks exciting and adventurous, so we jump into it. The thrill of the new project is exciting and yet terrifying at the same time. We rush in with the same energy and excitement that adrenaline often produces. It is only after we have “jumped” that we realize the damage that has occurred. In my situation, I think I was more motivated by the “youth” aspect of the jump, than the actual challenge. I have noticed they recovered much quicker than I did and I think the same is true in ministry.

The bruises and pain will heal over time, but I have learned my lesson, I will stay in the boat next time.

THOT – I wonder how many times “seasoned” pastors are lured by the excitement that we see in what younger people are doing in ministry? How much pain have we brought to ministry because we jumped when we should have stayed in the boat? Have we really counted the cost before we embark on the new adventure that looks so appealing? Jump or stay in the boat?

Juenny Glutch

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Iowa just set a record rainfall amount for the month of June. In fact we beat the previous record by almost 6 inches. The airport reported 16.65 inches for June swamping the May 1903 record of 11.78 inches. In my home that is an important statistic. In a matter of 48 hours, I received over 8 inches of rain at my home. My 7 foot retaining wall decided it could not hold that much water and it collapsed.

The wall was a problem when we started landscaping, but over the last 7 years, it has held up well . . . . that is until last month. I immediately started the work to rebuild the wall. I gained a new appreciation for Nehemiah and his 42 day project. I was able to accomplish mine in a matter of a few weeks, but I noticed a small problem. Apparently when I set the bottom row of blocks, I was off about a quarter of an inch. This small number was insignificant for the bottom 4 rows. As I started to get taller, the 1/4 of an inch became magnified with each additional row. By the time I got two rows from the top, my wall was off about 2 1/2 inches. It bowed noticeable outward and I had resolved that it would need to be redone.

I was planning on rebuilding it later this summer or early fall. Those plans changed when we got a 2 inch rain in 20 minutes over the weekend. I looked out my office window to notice the wall in a pile of block and mud. It was a lesson learned the hard way. In a hurry to finish the wall, I neglected to pay attention to the small details (1/4 of an inch to be exact).

It reminded me of an important ministry principle. Neglect the small things and they tend to grow and magnify over time. I can give you all the reasons that I didn’t pay attention to that small 1/4 of an inch, but in the end, it will cost me more time and money than doing it right the first time. If you want to talk to me this summer, I will be out rebuilding my wall, but I will take my time and do it right this time.

THOT – What small things are you neglecting for the sake of time? Will those things multiply and cost you more in the future? What would happen if we stopped and took care of those things now?

wooden_ruler

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