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Posts Tagged ‘Vision’

Sometimes it is best to stay in the boat

We just finished our annual summer vacation with the family. We enjoy taking everyone to the Black Hills in South Dakota. We rent a cabin for the week and the set out to explore and enjoy the area. This year we decided to spend a day on Lake Pactola (about 30 minutes from Mount Rushmore). We reneted a pontoon boat for the day and planned a relaxing day.

The problem came as we were checking out the boat and I noticed tee shirts for sale that said “I survived Cliff jumping at Jenny Gulch”. By nature I am an adrenaline junkie, so I was very interested. After spending some time exploring the lake, we found Jenny Gulch. It was not marked, but with the help of You Tube videos we were able to safely identify the 30-40 foot cliff (depending on water levels).

Two of the twenty some year olds were the first explore the top of the cliff. Meanwhile my wife, myself and my future daughter in law stayed in the boat. After about 30 minutes of them trying to decide whether they should jump, my future daughter in law jumped out of the boat, went to the top and jumped. My wife and I stayed in the boat and took videos and photos. The other 2 jumped and everyone was excited and petrified at the same time.

The adrenaline junkie (me) stayed the in the boat.  My wife would never do something like this, so I was the only one who would even consider doing something that people half my age had just done. I jumped out of the boat, walked to the top and jumped off the cliff. I landed with a large splash since I entered the water in a more horizontal position rather than a vertical one.

As the day progressed, we realized the role that adrenaline plays in the body to mask pain. In the days that followed, bruises started to show on everyone and mine covered over 2 square feet of my body. As I look back, I think I should have stayed in the boat. My wife who stayed in the boat had a wonderful, exciting, pain free experience that day.

I started to think about how in ministry, we often do the same thing. A new program looks exciting and adventurous, so we jump into it. The thrill of the new project is exciting and yet terrifying at the same time. We rush in with the same energy and excitement that adrenaline often produces. It is only after we have “jumped” that we realize the damage that has occurred. In my situation, I think I was more motivated by the “youth” aspect of the jump, than the actual challenge. I have noticed they recovered much quicker than I did and I think the same is true in ministry.

The bruises and pain will heal over time, but I have learned my lesson, I will stay in the boat next time.

THOT – I wonder how many times “seasoned” pastors are lured by the excitement that we see in what younger people are doing in ministry? How much pain have we brought to ministry because we jumped when we should have stayed in the boat? Have we really counted the cost before we embark on the new adventure that looks so appealing? Jump or stay in the boat?

Juenny Glutch

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“It is what it is”

On the way home from a service at the local cemetery on Memorial Day, my wife and I were admiring the new sign that had been erected in town. My home is located 6 miles from the church and passes through “our town” of Climbing Hill. Climbing Hill has less than 100 people and 1 stop sign. The town has spent the last year raising money to erect a new town sign. The built a nice brick wall and had someone make metal letters that were attached to the brick. Below, they added a slogan. We didn’t know the town even had a slogan. The new slogan – “It is what it is.”

My wife and I could hardly believe what we saw. We started laughing and could not stop until we got home. We could not believe someone actually put that on a sign. They actually took great pride in the fact that they were VERY comfortable with who they were. They were not trying to be the big city with a gas station, grocery store, etc. They were a small town and they were happy about it. They were not trying to be anything other than who they were.

I have mixed emotions as I think about our little town. I wonder if they see the possibilities of anything more. Can they envision a small town cafe? They had one years ago. Had they given up on being anything more than just who they are? On the other hand, it takes so real courage to realize your limitations. They are an unincorporated town, so they get no monies from government or outside sources. Maybe they are just being realistic in acknowledging who they are as a town.

Regarding ministry, I face the same tension. I want to have a vision for larger future, but I also have to be realistic about limitations of people, time, location, and money. It is a delicate balance, but a healthy balance is essential to our future. If my vision for the future is too big, it becomes overwhelming and discouraging to the people. If my vision is nonexistent or too small, it can breed apathy. My “little town” that has a slogan of “It is what it is” has got me thinking about my “little” church.

THOT
– Are you maintaining a healthy balance between vision and reality?

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